Expertise and Denial: NT Studies Edition

In the late 2000s-early 2010s it was particularly in vogue to respond to the work of various philosophers who had expressed interest in St. Paul, perhaps the most monstrous figure Christianity had on offer.

Paul and the Philosophers

While Jesus is often above significant reproach (note Nietzsche’s divergent feelings toward these figures…), Paul is often a figure of backwardness, misogyny, a sort of lawful lawlessness, a static-rule filled Christianity that just can’t get in line with the radical Jesus who fulfills the dreams of both conservative and liberal readers.

This interest helped to bring back shades to Paul that were often missing outside of the discipline. But, the figurations of Paul created have often be loathed by NT scholars. Why?

Well, a rather obvious answer is that the plaything of the discipline was being shared outward with disciplines that seem to lack the critical tools to deal with the apostle. There is a shared difficulty here: while the charge could be true, the ability for many biblical scholars to understand the nuances of what is actually going on in these figurations of Paul is stunted.

I don’t recall many Pauline scholars orienting themselves around the works of Schmitt, Benjamin, or Taubes in order to better understand how Agamben is utilising Paul, and whether it coincides with what could be said about Paul from popular disciplinary readings.

But, what I find more annoying is the half-baked reading of theory that often happens in the discipline. I recently noted this happening in regard to the concept of ‘gift’ and the fixation on Derrida. Which, really, is fine to do. Derrida is, after all, well-known for his work on the gift. But, every time I have found Derrida in contemporary NT studies, he is butchered and lays on the page as a sort of scapegoat, sacrificed for just not getting what the gift really is (he should have just paid more attention to Mauss, obviously…).

Except, every time he comes up in this regard, he is understood in a facile manner. And, while it may not ruin the argument being made by the writer, it is certainly egregious because Derrida is asking questions that pierce to the heart of the issue!

It was while ranting about this on social media that Jonathan Bernier noted the importance of treating scholarship like a dialogue with not just a thinker, but the community of scholars who are working on that thinker and within a separate discipline. This is surely something we need to keep in mind, especially when attempting to use work that is outside of our usual disciplinary marker.

Let us read more, listen more, and respond with caution.

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2 comments on “Expertise and Denial: NT Studies Edition

  1. Jeff Shoup says:

    Jesus being above reproach even in scholarly discussion is certainly an unproductive restraint on Western thought.

    • Definitely agree. I think pretend objectivity about the figure of Jesus has really held back, for instance, Historical Jesus research (not to mention other areas). Would love to hear more from you about this.

      It may be of some interest to you, but last year I recorded a conversation between my supervisor, Ward Blanton, and a young Matthew scholar, Robert Myles. Robert’s a good friend, and this discussion was concerning a recent article he published in the Journal for the Study of the Historical Jesus. He looked, in this article, at the diametrically opposed political projects of those who claim a ‘subversive’ Jesus. Whether one is a Crossan or a Wright, the claim is that Jesus is a ‘subversive’ figure, and here he becomes a sort of theologised figuration who is ‘above reproach’ and always serves the ideological reading of the interpreter.

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